NASIG 2012: Managing E-Publishing — Perfect Harmony for Serialists

Presenters: Char Simser (Kansas State University) & Wendy Robertson (University of Iowa)

Iowa looks at e-publishing as an extension of the central mission of the library. This covers not only text, but also multimedia content. After many years of ad-hoc work, they formed a department to be more comprehensive and intentional.

Kansas really didn’t do much with this until they had a strategic plan that included establishing an open access press (New Prairie). This also involved reorganizing personnel to create a new department to manage the process, which includes the institutional depository. The press includes not only their own publications, but also hosts publications from a few other sources.

Iowa went with BEPress’ Digital Commons to provide both the repository and the journal hosting. Part of why they went this route for their journals was because they already had it for their repository, and they approach it more as being a hosting platform than as being a press/publisher. This means they did not need to add staff to support it, although they did add responsibilities to exiting staff in addition to their other work.

Kansas is using Open Journal Systems hosted on a commercial server due to internal politics that prevented it from being hosted on the university server. All of their publications are Gold OA, and the university/library is paying all of the costs (~$1700/year, not including the .6 FTE staff hours).

Day in the life of New Prairie Press — most of the routine stuff at Kansas involves processing DOI information for articles and works-cited, and working with DOAJ for article metadata. The rest is less routine, usually involving journal setups, training, consultation, meetings, documentation, troubleshooting, etc.

The admin back-end of OJS allows Char to view it as if she is different types of users (editor, author, etc.) to be able to trouble-shoot issues for users. Rather than maintaining a test site, they have a “hidden” journal on the live site that they use to test functions.

A big part of her daily work is submitting DOIs to CrossRef and going through the backfile of previously published content to identify and add DOIs to the works-cited. The process is very manual, and the error rate is high enough that automation would be challenging.

Iowa does have some subscription-based titles, so part of the management involves keeping up with a subscriber list and IP addresses. All of the titles eventually fall into open access.

Most of the work at Iowa has been with retrospective content — taking past print publications and digitizing them. They are also concerned with making sure the content follows current standards that are used by both library systems and Google Scholar.

There is more. I couldn’t take notes and keep time towards the end.

this land is your land

A geographic meme, courtesy of Sorcha. Also, places where US paper currency I have spent in the past four and a half years have gone.

bold the states you’ve been to, underline the states you’ve lived in and italicize the state you’re in now…

Alabama / Alaska / Arizona / Arkansas / California / Colorado / Connecticut / Delaware / Florida / Georgia / Hawaii / Idaho / Illinois / Indiana / Iowa / Kansas / Kentucky / Louisiana / Maine / Maryland / Massachusetts / Michigan / Minnesota / Mississippi / Missouri / Montana / Nebraska / Nevada / New Hampshire / New Jersey / New Mexico / New York / North Carolina / North Dakota / Ohio / Oklahoma / Oregon / Pennsylvania / Rhode Island / South Carolina / South Dakota / Tennessee / Texas / Utah / Vermont / Virginia / Washington / West Virginia / Wisconsin / Wyoming / Washington D.C /

Go HERE to have a form generate the HTML for you.

interrupt mindless TV viewing

Litterate activist action plan via Powell’s Books newsletter.

I just got around to reading the recent newsletter from Powell’s Books. One of the fun features of the newsletter is the random things they throw in between features. Here’s the one from this issue:

Every Saturday afternoon in the TV showroom of a big-box electronics outlet in Davenport, Iowa, a book group gathers, not to talk about books, but to read them. “It’s about time a little mindless TV viewing was interrupted by literature, instead of the other way around,” Helen Mabry told Quad Cities radio reporter Andrew Cummerbund. (“Helen!” another book group member could be heard saying in the background. “Don’t stir the pot!”)”

That would be so much fun! I’d love to get together a bunch of book-loving folk and go read at Best Buy.

dean in 2004

I’m going to vote for Dean.

I went to a Dean Meetup last night for the first time. I’ve been leaning towards him for a while now, and it was the final thing to make me decide that he is not only the candidate I will vote for in the Kentucky primaries, but also someone I am willing to volunteer to help. I wrote two letters last night – one to a woman in Iowa and the other to a man in New Mexico urging them to attend their caucuses and vote for Dean if they are so led. It felt good to do something that is grassroots political. I have been a registered Independent for many years (previously a registered Republican), but this past fall, when I moved to a new county, I registered as a Democrat. For the most part, I think the Kentucky Democratic Party and the DNC are out of touch with what Democrats and Democrat-minded folks want and need. I think that Howard Dean is different and can shake things up in a way that they need to be shaken. Also, he dislikes GW as much if not more than I do, which is a big bonus in my book. I promise I won’t turn this blog into a political forum to express my personal views, but I felt like I needed to share this – particularly since I have added a Dean banner.

what i’ve been reading

BookCrossing got a mention on LISNews.com on Thursday. I know quite a few librarians are BookCrossers, but I hope this encourages more to join in on the fun. As for LISNews — I can’t figure out how Blake has time to be posting several stories an hour!

Two of my e-friends from Where’s George? are blogging also, which makes me happy. Agent Splat (aka Marc) is a volunteer for an EMT in Wisconsin, and Idiot from Iowa (aka Chad) is a high school student in Iowa and is the only blogger I’ve read who wrote an entire entry in haiku.