NASIG in Louisville

Online registration for the NASIG conference in Louisville closes today at 5pm Eastern. If you haven’t registered already and have been toying around with doing so, today is your last chance. There will be on-site registration, but the price goes up by $50. This is going to be a good one, folks, so if you’re … Continue reading “NASIG in Louisville”

Online registration for the NASIG conference in Louisville closes today at 5pm Eastern. If you haven’t registered already and have been toying around with doing so, today is your last chance. There will be on-site registration, but the price goes up by $50.

This is going to be a good one, folks, so if you’re at all interested in serials and building communication among all the parties involved, you really should be at this conference. I’m not saying that because I’m a new member of the executive board — I’m saying it because it’s true.

Bonus: The Free Range Librarian herself, Karen Schneider, is one of the vision speakers.

my fellow country-men and women…

I’ve been elected to the executive board of NASIG, which is both thrilling and terrifying. NASIG has rocked my professional world from early on, and I’m very excited about being able to continue to contribute to the organization through the leadership structure. I will admit to also being slightly worried about the volume of work … Continue reading “my fellow country-men and women…”

I’ve been elected to the executive board of NASIG, which is both thrilling and terrifying. NASIG has rocked my professional world from early on, and I’m very excited about being able to continue to contribute to the organization through the leadership structure. I will admit to also being slightly worried about the volume of work that this might entail. In the past year, I’ve managed to push myself rather close to the edge of burnout, but for now I think I can keep from going over that edge.

Thank you to everyone who voted for me. If you’ll be in Louisville for the conference, be sure to say hello. I’ll be the woman wearing this. Well, at least for one day. I’ll probably be wearing this on one of the other days, and I’d like to point out that as a regular QC reader, I knew about it before it became popular with all the cool kids.

petticoat, petticoat

This up-and-coming pair of singer/songwriters are creating modern tunes that are reminiscent of 1960’s pop, rock, and folk.

cover of Every Mother's ChildYou might not know it, but Lexington and Louisville (Kentucky) are hotbeds of modern music. The bands and solo artists range from country and folk to rock and pop, with all sorts of variations and experimental genres in between. One such group is Lexington-based Petticoat, Petticoat, who create songs that are reminiscent of 1960’s pop, rock, and folk.

The core of the band is Kristin Messina (vocals/harmonica) and Dickie Haydon (guitar/vocals/keyboards/harmonica). The rest of the band members vary over time. For the purposes of this review, you may be interested to know that Scott Overall (drums/percussion) and Jackson Silvanik (bass) appear on Every Mother’s Child (Kalmia Records). Kristin Messina and Dickie HaydonThis is Petticoat, Petticoat’s first album, which surprised me because it is so good I expected that they would have had several previous recordings to fine-tune their studio skills in order to produce this one.

Haydon is the primary lyricist, and he stays firmly in the realm of rock and pop lyrics, never straying too far into the storytelling of folk. Regardless of the style of music that is used to dress the song, Hadyn keeps the message simple and direct. He sings “you’ve got tank tops and orange tans / and we’re bathing all dressed in sand / give me your longest finger / ’cause I’ve got a ring for your hand” in one of the verses of “Crosshair,” and the rest of the album isn’t much more complicated than that. Compared to some of the pretentious lyricism prevalent in indie music, it is refreshing to hear someone writing straightforward lyrics while maintaining the poetry of the form.

One of the highlights of Every Mother’s Child is the waltzing “Love In An Alley,” which shows off the warm tones of Messina’s vocals. Another gem from the album is “We’re Gonna Be Poor.” The song is a blues-rock romp through the economical trials and tribulations of musical couples. “Maria the Tour Guide” is a sun-drenched acoustic pop for modern-day hippies. Finally, “Glittering Heels” concludes the album with the satisfying crash of electric guitar and percussion that is guaranteed to make pop-rock fans squee with delight.

Every Mother’s Child is a promising beginning for Petticoat, Petticoat. I look forward to hearing what they will do next.

If you want a copy of the album, you’re going to have to order it directly from the record label or pick it up at one of their shows.

towing

I should quit this librarian gig, get a tow truck, and then I’ll be living high on the hog!

Last Saturday, I drove over to Louisville to attend the first annual Living Out Loud music festival. I volunteered to help promote the National Women’s Music Festival by chatting up folks who came by the table, and also several of my friends were performing in the festival. A good time was had by all, and afterwards my famished performer friends and I caravaned on over to Ramsi’s Café on the World for some fabulous food.

At this point in the evening it was nearly 11:30pm, so none of us thought much about parking across the street in the Mid-City Mall lot, since it was obvious that the mall was closed and there were plenty of spaces away from the mall itself. I was the only one in my group of five (the other three arrived later) who noticed the “parking for mall customers only sign,” but I assumed that it would be okay. Why would the mall need those spaces at 11:30pm on a Saturday night? Right? Wrong.

It seems that they have recently gotten tough on those parking there who are not mall patrons. During the day, it’s harder to catch them, but after the mall closes, it’s apparently a gold mine for Dave’s Towing Service. At $107 a pop, no wonder they are quick to tow offender’s vehicles away. Out of the eight of us, they made $428 that night. Cash. That was the most expensive dessert I’ve ever had.

We had such a great time talking and laughing at Ramsi’s that it was quite a shock to walk out at 1 a.m. and realize that our vehicles were no longer parked in the lot. We managed to get directions to the lot where our vehicles were being held and flagged down a taxi. Once we got there, we encountered Mr. Towing Jerk. MTJ sat in his monstrous truck with the huge engine loudly running as we tried to explain to him that only two of us had our $107 in cash on us, but that the other two had their money in their cars. He seemed quite put out that he would have to take them to the lot at the far end of the street in order for them to get the money for their cars. Mind you, my friends with the money in the cars had all of their gear and instruments in those cars. We weren’t leaving.

MTJ finally drove down to the other lot, with one of my friends in the truck with him. He offered to let the rest of us ride in the back, but I wasn’t getting in there. The three of us decided to take our chances walking down the road to the lot. All of us but my friend who rode with MTJ quickly found our vehicles and were able to move them over towards the exit. However, the fourth vehicle was blocked by another car, and MTJ sat there with his engine running and headlights in our eyes until one of his tow trucks returned to move the blocking vehicle. By 2am, we returned to the Mid-City Mall parking lot and retrieved the other four passengers.

Dave’s Towing Service was out in full force that night, and I pity the other souls that had to deal with Mr. Towing Jerk. The $107 was a hard hit to my wallet, but his attitude was a much harsher blow. Yeah, I’m sure he has to deal with a bunch of drunks every night, but we were obviously not drunk and equally obviously stranded without our vehicles. The least he could have done was shown us some sympathy for our situation. However, for a towing service charging an outrageous $107, I’m not surprised that they only hire the worst dredges of humanity.

I’m looking forward to hearing what the five songwriters in the group come up with in retribution.

live@your conference

Wanna see me in action? I will be doing a presentation on my library’s implementation of SFX at the Kentucky Library Association‘s fall conference in Louisville this October. My session is at 10:10am on Friday, so you’ll even get to sleep in a little. One small complaint about the conference organization: I was never notified … Continue reading “live@your conference”

Wanna see me in action? I will be doing a presentation on my library’s implementation of SFX at the Kentucky Library Association‘s fall conference in Louisville this October. My session is at 10:10am on Friday, so you’ll even get to sleep in a little.

One small complaint about the conference organization: I was never notified that my proposal had been accepted. I found out last night when I received the conference brochure in the mail and read through the presenations. In any case, I had already planned on giving the presentation, so I was happy to find out that they were planning on it, too.

have you heard the cowgirl rap song?

Last night, I had the pleasure of seeing some friends of mine perform at a coffee house in Louisville. Often times it is difficult for a musician or a band to perform at home because so many people in the audience “knew them back when” and still have the mentality that the band is a … Continue reading “have you heard the cowgirl rap song?”

Last night, I had the pleasure of seeing some friends of mine perform at a coffee house in Louisville. Often times it is difficult for a musician or a band to perform at home because so many people in the audience “knew them back when” and still have the mentality that the band is a local phenomenon that has not matured or improved over the years. Last night’s audience was not one of those audiences. They were attentive and relaxed. They didn’t talk through the songs, and they weren’t there just to see who else was there. The best part of it all is that they enjoyed seeing and hearing my friends perform as professional musicians, and they gave them the respect that entails. It was so nice to hear my friends perform locally without having to sit with an audience that treated them like just another bar band (which they aren’t). The warmth and connection between them and the audience was almost like seeing them at a house concert, which is the best venue of all, in my humble opinion.

I found my first BookCrossing book yesterday. I was up in Lexington running some errands before driving to Louisville for the show, and I thought I might try hunting for a recently released one. I lucked out and it hadn’t been picked up by someone else yet. I’ve read a couple of the stories so far, and it’s been okay. Not really my genre, but I figure I’ll benefit from broadening my horizons a little.

There was an interesting spot on The Splendid Table today about small batch bourbons. The show was a repeat broadcast, but I hadn’t heard it the first time around. If you like bourbon, this would be one to listen to. Living where I am, I’m familiar with some of the names of small batch bourbons made in Kentucky, but Frederick Booker Noe talked about a few made by the Jim Beam company that I had not heard of before.

Continue reading “have you heard the cowgirl rap song?”