i want my country back!

I just read Howard Dean’s new book….

Some friends generously gave me a gift certificate to Powell’s Books for my birthday this year, and this weekend I had the opportunity to visit that giant independent bookstore in Portland. I used their gift to purchase a copy of Howard Dean’s new book, You Have the Power, which I just finished reading tonight. It is both educational and inspiring, with the right mix between his reflections on his presidential race and his vision for the revitalization of the Democratic Party. On assuming that Democrats have the African-American vote, Dean writes,

“The truth is

deaniacs today

NPR talks to Deaniacs in the Baltimore area.

NPR also had a piece by Linda Wertheimer on Deaniacs and their thoughts and opinions on the presidential race a few months after Dean has dropped out. Yes, we are still meeting up every month. Yes, we are still very active in changing American politics from the grassroots level on up. You can join us if you want to help make change happen.

CFK gets some props

Change for Kentucky gets national attention.

Jeremy Horton, the man who is keeping the Dean spirit alive in Kentucky, guest blogged at Blog for America this week. After scrolling through the first part of the comments folks left, I am reminded of why I never bothered to read the comments at BfA; far too many people using it as a bulletin board to post their random whatever about semi-related subjects.

politics sucks

I feel betrayed by the Democrats.

Howard Dean is going to endorse John Kerry. I will still vote for Dean in the Kentucky primary, and for Kerry in the Presidential elections, but I will not lift a finger for either of them. I’m still pissed at Kerry and the media for their treatment of Dean, and now I’m pissed at Dean for actually endorsing Kerry. Even though Kerry is going to win the nomination, I still hoped that Dean would stand firm in his beliefs and continue to raise the issues that need to be addressed. As far as I’m concerned, by endorsing Kerry, he has effectively wiped out anything good that his campaign brought to American politics.

Local politics aren’t much happier for me. Democrat Dan Mongiardo, who is challenging incumbent Republican Jim Bunning for the US Senate seat this November, happens to also be a co-sponsor of the Kentucky Senate bill that will amend the Kentucky state constitution to not only exclude gay people from getting married, but also exclude us from the benefits any kind of domestic partnership. This guy is supposed to be better for me than some Republican?

Both of these things are making me think about why I should stay in the Democratic party. On the one hand, if I’m not around to force the party leadership to take me and others like me seriously, then they will continue to move closer to the Republicans. On the other hand, I don’t want to have anything to do with these homophobic, spineless…. jerks.

*deep breath*

open access publications in library science

More thoughts, links, and general blabbing on open access publishing.

On the LIBLICENSE-L, Rick Anderson recently brought up the question of whether or not the American Libraries Association (ALA) has considered going to an open access publishing model for it’s publications. It seems that the Medical Library Association has one open access journal, although it isn’t listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) at this time and is only available through PubMedCentral. Oddly enough, they do have subscription rates. The Science and Technology Section of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) (a part of ALA) has made their Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship quarterly available online through an open access model.

As I mentioned yesterday, my dean asked me to put together some information about open access for the other librarians here and to come up with ways that we could be involved with the open access movement. I’ve been surfing around the web and in databases this afternoon, looking for articles and other information that can help me distill this nebulous thing down to something I and my colleagues can digest. I was surprised by how many titles were listed on the DOAJ page for library and information science. There is only one that I recognize imediately as being reputable, and that is D-Lib Magazine. Also, like any list of journals, there are likely to be title changes and publications that have ceased.

DOAJ

My library dean has me working on ways to bring more awareness of the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and open access publications in general. It has been a while since I took a look at the DOAJ, so I have just spent about five minutes browsing around in there. It looks a lot … Continue reading “DOAJ”

My library dean has me working on ways to bring more awareness of the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and open access publications in general. It has been a while since I took a look at the DOAJ, so I have just spent about five minutes browsing around in there. It looks a lot cleaner than I remembered. I appreciate the New Titles page, but as I was skimming through, I thought to myself, “Wouldn’t it be great if they had an RSS feed for their new titles? Or at the very least, an email list?”

dean in 2004

I’m going to vote for Dean.

I went to a Dean Meetup last night for the first time. I’ve been leaning towards him for a while now, and it was the final thing to make me decide that he is not only the candidate I will vote for in the Kentucky primaries, but also someone I am willing to volunteer to help. I wrote two letters last night – one to a woman in Iowa and the other to a man in New Mexico urging them to attend their caucuses and vote for Dean if they are so led. It felt good to do something that is grassroots political. I have been a registered Independent for many years (previously a registered Republican), but this past fall, when I moved to a new county, I registered as a Democrat. For the most part, I think the Kentucky Democratic Party and the DNC are out of touch with what Democrats and Democrat-minded folks want and need. I think that Howard Dean is different and can shake things up in a way that they need to be shaken. Also, he dislikes GW as much if not more than I do, which is a big bonus in my book. I promise I won’t turn this blog into a political forum to express my personal views, but I felt like I needed to share this – particularly since I have added a Dean banner.

Dean

Howard Dean has a weblog? I think he must be the first Presidential candidate to jump on the blogging bandwagon. [thanks mike] I think I’m going to abstain from the primaries. It’s all about who has the most money, anyway. I’ll let those who care enough pick one from all of the Democrat candidates, and … Continue reading “Dean”

Howard Dean has a weblog? I think he must be the first Presidential candidate to jump on the blogging bandwagon. [thanks mike]

I think I’m going to abstain from the primaries. It’s all about who has the most money, anyway. I’ll let those who care enough pick one from all of the Democrat candidates, and then I’ll decide if I want to vote for him (maybe a her, but not likely). Wait…if? Okay, to be honest, I’ll vote for anyone who is running against Bush and has a chance of winning, which basically means whomever is the Democrat candidate. As for Dean mania, I think that yesterday’s Doonesbury spoke volumes.

portable information technology

Yesterday, Open Stacks author Greg Schwartz wrote about smart tags being used for books so that wireless phone users could point their phone at the book and call up information from the OPAC or websites like Amazon.com, and that got me thinking. My library Dean came back from ALA fired up about a new technology … Continue reading “portable information technology”

Yesterday, Open Stacks author Greg Schwartz wrote about smart tags being used for books so that wireless phone users could point their phone at the book and call up information from the OPAC or websites like Amazon.com, and that got me thinking. My library Dean came back from ALA fired up about a new technology in barcoding called RFID (Radio Frequency Identification). Right now it’s a hot topic among consumer advocacy and privacy groups, but the technology has been slowly creeping into libraries through technologies like self-checkout systems and collection inventories.

Personally, I’m divided on the issue. I think that libraries will likely use this technology responsibly by doing things like turning off the tags after they have been legitimately checked out so that they will not be able to track where the book is physically (except for the information in the patron record, of course). I do have some concerns regarding commercial use of the tags. I understand the security issues, but if the tags aren’t automatically turned off when the item is purchased, much like when the ink tag is removed from an item of clothing, then it does pose some questions about consumer privacy.

As for Mr. Schwartz’s wish for smart tags in books that talk to wireless phones, I expect that it shouldn’t be long before someone develops a technology that will facilitate the communication between RFID and smart tags.

public radio is endangered

I was talking with my Dean earlier today, and she told me about a network of Christian radio stations moving in to take out National Public Radio stations by taking over their frequencies. At first I thought it couldn’t be true, much less legal, but then I found a recent New York Times article reporting … Continue reading “public radio is endangered”

I was talking with my Dean earlier today, and she told me about a network of Christian radio stations moving in to take out National Public Radio stations by taking over their frequencies. At first I thought it couldn’t be true, much less legal, but then I found a recent New York Times article reporting on two NPR affiliate stations in Louisiana that were kicked off of the airwaves by American Family Radio resulting in a community of 95,000 people not having access to public radio (which includes local programming, unlike what AFR provides). As an on-air person at a local student-run radio station with a short broadcast range, this is disturbing to me.

“The Christian stations routed NPR in Lake Charles under a federal law that allows noncommercial broadcasters with licenses for full-power stations to push out those with weaker signals — the equivalent of the varsity team kicking the freshmen out of the gym.”

Jeffrey A. Dvorkin, Ombudsman for NPR has written a response to accusations of NPR having an agenda, liberal or otherwise, that is articulate and thoughtful.

If public radio was supposed to be an alternative, why do so many people feel excluded from those values?

Well, Congress voted yesterday. I knew they would give Dubya the power to join the “world’s worst leaders with the world’s worst weapons” but I kept hoping that more of them would hear the opposition (which is much larger and stronger than the media chooses to portray). Guess I should have known better, what with the elections being so soon.