NASIG 2012: Everyone’s a Player — Creation of Standards in a Fast-Paced Shared World

Speaker: Nettie Lagace, NISO – National Information Standards Organization

NISO is responsible for a lot of the things we work with all the time, by making the systems work more seamlessly and getting everyone on the same page. More than you may think. They operate on a staff of five: one who is the public face and cheerleader, one who travels to anywhere needed, one who makes sure that the documents are properly edited, and two who handle the technical aspects of the organization/site/commitees/etc.

Topic committees identify needs that become the working groups that tackle the details. Where there is an issue, there’s a working group, with many people involved in each.

New NISO work items consider:
What is not working and how it impacts stakeholders.
How it relates to existing efforts.
Beneficiaries of the deliverables and how.
Stakeholders.
Scope of the initiative.
Encouragement for implementation.

Librarians aren’t competitive in the ways that other industries might be, so this kind of work is more natural for them. The makeup of the working group tries to keep a balance so that no single interest category makes up the majority of the membership. Consensus is a must. They are also trying to make the open process aspect be more visible/accessible to the general public.

Speaker: Marshall Breeding

Library search has evolved quite a bit, from catalog searches that essentially replicated the card catalog process to federated searching to discovery interfaces to consolidated indexes. Libraries are increasingly moving towards these consolidated indexes to cover all aspects of their collections.

There is a need to bring some order to the market chaos this has created. Discovery brings value to library collections, but it brings some uncertainty to publishers. More importantly, uneven participation diminishes the impact, and right now the ecosystem is dominated by private agreements.

What is the right level of investment in tools that provide access to the millions of dollars of content libraries purchase every year? To be effective, these tools need to be comprehensive, so what do we need to do to encourage all of the players to participate and make the playing field fair to all. How do libraries figure out which discovery service is best for them?

The NISO Open Discovery Initiative hopes to bring some order to that chaos, and they plan to have a final draft by May 2013.

Speaker: Regina Reynolds, Library of Congress

From the beginning, ejournals have had many pain points. What brought this to a head was the problem with missing previous titles in online collections. Getting from a citation to the content doesn’t work when the name is different.

There were issues with missing or incorrect numbering, publishing statements, and dates. And then there are the publishers that used print ISSN for the electronic version. As publishers began digitizing back content, these issues grew exponentially. Guidelines were needed.

After many, many conversations, The Presentation & Identification of E-Journals (PIE-J) was produced and is available for comment until July 5th. The most important part is the three pages of recommended practices.

See also: In Search of Best Practices for Presentation of E-Journals by Regina Romano Reynolds and Cindy Hepfer

Dubya, Vampires, and Mennonites, oh my!

My friend Drew has made a weblog that is a satire of George W.’s private diary. It’s pretty funny.

“Just kickin’ back today. havin’ some Tecate, eatin’ pretzels and watchin’ some college football. Go Longhorns! Makes me miss mah days as a cheerleader back at Yale. Man, them were the days.”

I have been a part of a live-action role playing game for the past three years that is based on White Wolf‘s Vampire: The Masquerade. The game I am in isn’t as dark as RPG games tend to be, and I have had fun with it. I think if LARP as being more like improv theatre than the stereotypical D&D image that role playing games tend to bring up in the minds of the uninitiated. Anyway, while I was surfing around tonight, I ran across a list of Garou (aka werewolf) light bulb jokes.

How many Fianna does it take to screw in a lightbulb? One to screw it in, and nine to write bad poems and songs about it.

Today, I joined an online organization of folks who are willing to let independant touring musicians crash on their couches for a night or two. It’s called The Artist Couch Exchange and reminds me of Mennonite Your Way. Hmm…. I wonder if MYW will ever go electronic? Seems to me that it would be more up-to-date with out requiring frequent pressings.