CIL 2011: In Pursuit of Library Elegance

Speaker: Erica Reynolds

Elegant solutions/designs are often invisible to the user. Observe what is happening, and look at what could be removed (distractions/barriers), rather than what needs to be added.

Simple rules create effective order. The more complexity in an equation, the more doubtful that it is true.

Another aspect of elegance is seduction. Limiting information creates intrigue. Libraries could play more on curiosity to draw users to information. Play hard to get, in a way. Don’t be so eager to dump information in response to user questions.

Restraint and removal can increase impact and value. Encourage people to use their brains. Why do we act like they are so stupid that they need signs everywhere in the library?

Limited resources spark creativity and innovation. The creative tension at the center of elegance: achieving the maximum effect with the minimum of effort.

The path to elegance begins with: resisting the urge to act; observe; ensure a diversity of opinions and expertise are heard; carve out time to think and not think; get away from your devices; get some sleep; and get outside.

Speaker: John Blyberg

The primary intent of our website may not be about getting you from point A to point B. It could be about building community and connection.

They found that when they removed the fortress that was the old reference desk, it was much more popular and approachable. Like Apple not including a manual with the iPhone, your library should be intuitive enough to use with minimal signage or instruction. Digital signage can evolve and be interactive, which will spark curiosity and inquiry.

IL2009: Connecting Through "Lights, Cameras & Action"

Speaker: Sean Robinson

Stories are essentially a contract between the author and the listener, and filmmaking is about storytelling. Before you start filming, have a story in mind, whether it’s a PSA or something more involved. Stories have beginnings, middles, and endings. You have three choices: comedy, tragedy, or drama — pick one or combine them.

Vade Mecum (take a book with you) was shot on a Canon PowerShot A570. 6,000 photos were shot and edited together with a soundtrack. You can do that with the stories you want to share.

Speakers: Michael Porter & David Lee King

Over 600 images were submitted from about 400 people. There are already over 1700 fans of the Facebook page.

The video looks really cool. I need to watch it again to read the words ’cause I was so focused on seeing all the photos. Go check out the website at Libraryman.com and watch it yourself. The point is, they think there are 101 resources and things that librarians should know. Add to it!

hangin by a string

Earlier this week, I saw that my friends Kiya & Miriam had a gig up in Germantown, Maryland, last night. I noted that they didn’t have anything else booked on the day before or after, so I emailed them to see if they would have time to stop and visit, since their route would take them by Richmond. I didn’t hear back for sure until Saturday morning, and that was just an email telling me to call later.

I called when I was on my way to a Sacred Harp singing. I’d spent the morning writing, and I’d planned to do some much needed house-cleaning after the singing. However, those plans were scrapped in a few short minutes.

Turns out, they were only about a half an hour away from Richmond, and there was room in the car for me, so did I want to go with them? Heck, yeah!

I quickly dashed home and attempted to do some guest preparations. They arrived shortly thereafter, and off we went.

The show was faboo, despite Kiya having just gotten over being sick and Miriam coming down with what she had. I took some photos, but most of them didn’t turn out too well due to the dim lighting in the venue. I also thought to use my camera to capture some audio/video. Here’s most of the encore, “Hangin by a String”: