Swimming in pool is nice and cool. The only way to catch a fish.

I’m selling a few things on eBay. Take a look and see if there’s anything you might want.

I’ve been enjoying the Lord of the Rings movies so far. I’m glad I finally broke down a few years ago and read the books (my parents have been Tolkein fans since they were in college). It has allowed me to more fully appreciate the humor that has cropped up since the masses started to become aware of Hobbits and Elves. Here’s an old music video done by Leonard Nimoy on the topic of Bilbo Baggins. Also, for you fans of Peeps experiments, here is the long-awaited Lord of the Peeps.

Here is a website that is supposed to be able to give you suggestions for bands you might like based on three bands you know you like. I tried several different combinations, and inevitably I would end up with a suggestion for Eden Burning. So, I think it’s more fun to play the “Degrees of Eden Burning” game with it, instead.

If I had money, I would probably buy some bar code art. It’s creative and fun, and being a librarian, I see a lot of bar codes every day.

The USA Patriot Act has put librarians in a sticky situation with regards to patron privacy. Here is one scenario that could very well become a reality. National Public Radio’s All Things Considered also ran a piece on librarians and the USA Patriot Act this evening. [link to ATC segment added 1/22/03 10:13am]

Here’s a humorous yet poignant take on the recent Supreme Court decision on the Sony Bono Copyright Term Extension Act. Surprisingly enough, this came to me via a stalwart conservative who thought it was just a joke. I think it makes a valid point.

Is the proposed Bush “tax cut” classist? Some folks, like in this opinon piece from the New York Times, seem to think so.

Feeling depressed and lonely because the world is going to hell in a handbasket? Here’s something to cheer you up!

Did you eat your vegetables today?

Someone actually sent me $5 for my Save Anna project! Woo-hoo! I’ll be starting a thank you page as soon as I can.

    Do you miss playing with your Mr. Potato Head®? Fret no longer – Mr.Potato, The Professor, Miss Onion & Mrs. Pepper are here to entertain you when the boss isn’t looking.
    Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D,CA) may be the first woman to hold the office of House Democratic leader. Is this a good thing or a bad thing?
    Molly Ivins has an interesting take on Paul Wellstone’s legacy and our duty to be involved with the political process.

    “In this putrid election season, every television ad seems to announce that the other guy sucks eggs, runs on all fours, molests small children and has the brain of an adolescent pissant. It’s tempting to join the “pox on both their houses” crowd. They’re close to right, but they’re still wrong.”

    Lasty, the New York Times has printed some of the favorite questions and answers of the reference librarian who writes the Ask a Librarian column in the Folger Shakespeare Library‘s newsletter.

hiking

I went hiking today at the Pinnacles near Berea. As I drove up to the Indian Fort Theater parking lot, I could see little droplets of rain on my windshield and I wished that I had remembered to bring the rain jacket I bought after a hike in the rain last spring. It’s the kind of jacked that rolls up into a stuff sack the size of a hoagie bun. The rain didn’t continue, and by the time I got out of the car, it had stopped completely. None of the rest of my hiking companions had arrived, so I waited and watched the way the clouds draped over the tops of the foothills and attempted to read a book. Soon, Mary arrived and we decided to start hiking, since it didn’t seem that anyone else was coming today. The leaves on the trees had turned shades of red, orange, and yellow, with some greens remaining. When I would take my glasses off (the hike was strenuous enough that my body heat combined with the temperature made the lenses fog over frequently), it almost seemed like the far side of the hills were painted in watercolors that had bled together. I hadn’t hiked that trail in almost two years, and in the interim time I had forgotten that the trail went up and up without many level places until we reached the top. Once we were there, the view was well worth the effort. Mary and I stayed up there for fifteen or twenty minutes, catching our breath and enjoying the God-like feeling of watching the miniature world below. Then, we hiked back down (which was much easier than the hike up) and drove into Berea for a tasty lunch at Wanpen.

Two interesting articles arrived in my email today. One is yet another story about women in rock and how radio stations are starting to play them more. It’s well-written and does at least address the difficulty that women who write and perform original rock songs have in getting airplay on commercial radio stations.

“But not all radio stations are tuned in to the trend. When it comes to rock, testosterone still rules.”

The other story is the first positive article about weeding library collections I have ever read in a non-professional journal. It’s in the New York Times, so as usual, you’ll need to register in order to read it.

“In the lexicon of library science, managing such unwieldy growth is known as weeding. It’s the closest most New Yorkers will ever get to gardening.”

moving to new technology

Welcome to my new site! Hope you enjoy the change, I know I do.

There is an interesting article in the New York Times today about people who work with technology wanting to strip it out of their personal lives. I enjoy all of the tech stuff in my personal life at the moment, but there are times when I need a vacation from computers.

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folk is lesbian music of choice, over-paid librarians, and other modern myths

My friend Anna sent me a link yesterday to an article about folk music having become the sound of lesbian culture. I have noticed this phenomenon, but I had never really thought about it specifically. You can read the full article yourself, but it will require a free registration with the New York Times.

“We’re seeing the coming together of a way of life and a form of expression that’s kind of primary,” says Lisa Merrill, a professor of performance history at Hofstra University. “This doesn’t happen often.”

A county in Washington State wants to dissolve the entire county library system, according to this New York Times article. So far, petitioners have managed to collect enough signatures that it might actually make it onto the ballot. Aparently some folks are upset that they pay an average of $38 per year in property taxes to keep the rural libraries up and running. <sarcasm>Gee, that sure is a big chunk to be taking out of some family’s budget.</sarcasm> Seriously, folks, don’t you think that is a small price to pay to have access to free books and computers?

“I home-school my kids, and our four library cards are maxed out at 40 books at all times,” said Linda Arrell, who lives off the electric power grid with her family north of here. “They say everybody is on the Internet, so we don’t need a library. Well, some of us don’t have credit cards, and some of us don’t have power.”

Oh, and that bit about the head librarian’s salary being too high? Let’s put this in perspective here, folks. Ms. Robinson is responsible for nine library branches, which includes all of the staff and budget issues that any large organization spanning a geographic area that size would have. If she were in the corporate world, she would be making three times as much.