#2

My review of Lipstick & Dipstick’s Essential Guide to Lesbian Relationships by Gina Daggett and Kathy Belge has been published on Blogcritics. I read the book over the first week of this month, but I didn’t have time to start writing the review until the end of last week. Which I then left on my work laptop (what I had with me in the hotel where I wrote the first two paragraphs) over the weekend. Otherwise, it would have been finished and published long before now.

[The book] may seem to be targeted at a limited audience, and for the most part, the examples given would mainly be applicable to lesbian relationships only; however, the core of their advice — from dating to long-term commitment decisions — rings true for any romantic relationship, regardless of the gender of those involved.

culture of lesbianism

I’ve been reading the Blog of a Bookslut for a few months now, and aside from getting news and brief commentary on book-related things, I am also greatly amused by Jessica’s and Michael’s slightly snarky take on it all. Here is Michael’s response to an interview with Edward Klein, the author of “The Truth About Hillary: What She Knew, When She Knew It, and How Far She’ll Go to Become President“:

“The culture of lesbianism”? Is Klein afraid that a President Hillary Clinton would name the Indigo Girls to the Supreme Court, or replace the tee ball games on the White House lawn with field hockey? Shit, I’d welcome a president from the “culture of lesbianism.” You could get away with wearing hiking boots to even the most formal of events.

lesbian icons

Lesbian icons – should they be replaced?

After my girlfriend saw the “you are a librarian!” page, she decided we needed to make something like that for lesbians, which we are currently working on. In doing a bit of online research for some stereotypical lesbian stuff that would make for rather humorous combinations, I ran across this essay on lesbian icons. The author asserts that it is time for the big four to be replaced and gives a few suggestions for their replacements. I thought the whole essay was hilarious – particularly the nail clipping reference.

“Sure, sometimes the lesbian stereotypes are true. I, for one, am a lesbian poster child, what with the short hair, the tattoos, and a penchant for sensible shoes. I am not, however, a huge Melissa Etheridge fan.”

folk is lesbian music of choice, over-paid librarians, and other modern myths

My friend Anna sent me a link yesterday to an article about folk music having become the sound of lesbian culture. I have noticed this phenomenon, but I had never really thought about it specifically. You can read the full article yourself, but it will require a free registration with the New York Times.

“We’re seeing the coming together of a way of life and a form of expression that’s kind of primary,” says Lisa Merrill, a professor of performance history at Hofstra University. “This doesn’t happen often.”

A county in Washington State wants to dissolve the entire county library system, according to this New York Times article. So far, petitioners have managed to collect enough signatures that it might actually make it onto the ballot. Aparently some folks are upset that they pay an average of $38 per year in property taxes to keep the rural libraries up and running. <sarcasm>Gee, that sure is a big chunk to be taking out of some family’s budget.</sarcasm> Seriously, folks, don’t you think that is a small price to pay to have access to free books and computers?

“I home-school my kids, and our four library cards are maxed out at 40 books at all times,” said Linda Arrell, who lives off the electric power grid with her family north of here. “They say everybody is on the Internet, so we don’t need a library. Well, some of us don’t have credit cards, and some of us don’t have power.”

Oh, and that bit about the head librarian’s salary being too high? Let’s put this in perspective here, folks. Ms. Robinson is responsible for nine library branches, which includes all of the staff and budget issues that any large organization spanning a geographic area that size would have. If she were in the corporate world, she would be making three times as much.