more music!

reviews of Elisa Peimer and Trio Mediaeval

In between all the moving tasks — Have I mentioned yet that I’m moving to Virginia? No? Well, I am. In December. More on that later. — I’ve found time to write a couple more music reviews. I currently have a DVD review and a book review that are nearly ready to go, followed by a product review, but I’m not sure if I’ll finish all of them before I leave for the Blog World Expo on Wednesday.

Elisa PeimerPull of the Moon [full review]

The album as a whole has a 1980s ballad rock feel to it. The production is definitely modern and rich enough in depth to stand up to the headphone test. It’s the arrangements that seem to be fixed in time with straight-forward percussion and lead electric guitar flourishes, and the standard verse-chorus-verse-chorus-bridge-chorus song structure.

Trio MediaevalFolk Songs [full review]

Until I listened to this album, I had not actively sought out Norwegian music, folk or otherwise. However, periodically a musical phrase would jump out as vaguely familiar. Often I found myself thinking of the collection of Anonymous 4 albums on my CD shelves.

In case you were wondering, I’m totally addicted to the Trio Mediaeval CD. I’ve had to force myself to listen to other things.

music for your ears

Been reviewing some more music lately. Here are three very different albums.

Been reviewing some more music lately. Here are three very different albums:

Care Bears on Fire – I Stole Your Animal [full review]

One might wonder how a twelve year old would have enough life experience to write songs that would appeal to the masses. Lead vocals and guitar are performed by Sophie, who happens to also be the band’s core songwriter. She touches on topics that range from junior high relationships (“5 Minute Boyfriend”) to the burden of depression (“Shadow Girl”) with as much lyrical skill as most anyone at least twice her age would do.

Missy Higgins – On A Clear Night [full review]

The production on On A Clear Night is subtle and highlights Higgins’ voice without making it too obvious that it has done so. It’s a characteristic that is common for lyrically-focused music, and in the flood of flashy unsubstantial pop tunes that seems to never stop, it’s refreshing to have something that grabs the listener and demands that attention be paid to the message. Clearly I am not the only music fan that feels this way, since Higgins’ fall tour in the US sold out quickly.

Pash – The Best Gun [full review]

The first thing that stands out, aside from Munoz's clear vocals, is the constant, driving, wall of sound pouring out from the instrumentation. Throughout nearly every song, the drums, bass, and guitar never seem to stop, constantly pouring out beats and sound. It's varied enough to stay interesting, but after a while it becomes exhausting. The ears hardly have a moment's rest, aside from the short breaks as the CD (or MP3) player moves from one track to the next, although thankfully the intensity lessens in the last few tracks.

also… a contest

If my review hasn’t turned you off completely, or if you’d just like a free DVD, here’s your chance. The first person to post in the comments the name of the state where James T. Kirk will be born in 226 years from this Thursday will get my review copy of the DVD. It’s just like the regular one, except the bar code has a hole punched through it.

Dubya, Vampires, and Mennonites, oh my!

My friend Drew has made a weblog that is a satire of George W.’s private diary. It’s pretty funny.

“Just kickin’ back today. havin’ some Tecate, eatin’ pretzels and watchin’ some college football. Go Longhorns! Makes me miss mah days as a cheerleader back at Yale. Man, them were the days.”

I have been a part of a live-action role playing game for the past three years that is based on White Wolf‘s Vampire: The Masquerade. The game I am in isn’t as dark as RPG games tend to be, and I have had fun with it. I think if LARP as being more like improv theatre than the stereotypical D&D image that role playing games tend to bring up in the minds of the uninitiated. Anyway, while I was surfing around tonight, I ran across a list of Garou (aka werewolf) light bulb jokes.

How many Fianna does it take to screw in a lightbulb? One to screw it in, and nine to write bad poems and songs about it.

Today, I joined an online organization of folks who are willing to let independant touring musicians crash on their couches for a night or two. It’s called The Artist Couch Exchange and reminds me of Mennonite Your Way. Hmm…. I wonder if MYW will ever go electronic? Seems to me that it would be more up-to-date with out requiring frequent pressings.