ER&L 2016: Using the Scrum Project Management Methodology to Create a Comprehensive Collection Assessment Framework

Scrum
“Scrum” by Curtis Pennell

Speaker: Galadriel Chilton, University of Connecticut

Used SCRUM for assessment project for their electronic resources collection. They wanted to make sure that all library staff in collection development would be able to manage annual reviews of eresources.

SCRUM: A breathtakingly brief and agile introduction by Chris Sims & Hillary Louise Johnson

First you put together a team, then you create the stories you want to build from the deliverables. Once you have your story, you have a sprint planning meeting for the following 2 week period, and this will take about 4 hours. This planning takes the deliverables and the story, and then develops the tasks needed to accomplish this. You’ll also need to factor in available time because the daily work still needs to be done. Each task will get an estimated time (determined by consensus). Tasks are assigned based on availability and skill set.

The sprint story board is a physical item. You document the story, then three columns of not started, in progress, and done. Each day of the sprint you have a check-in to report on the previous day’s work, problems, and the work that will be done that day.

One of the down sides is that they are a small team, and by the second or third sprint, they were getting exhausted by it. They had other jobs that needed to be done during this as well.

It worked really well for balancing the work against the other tasks of each person, and avoid burnout or a sense of imbalance.

Q: What other projects would be useful for this method?
A: Moving proxy services; mass communication with vendors to update mailing address and contacts; tracking time and deliverables for annual reporting; projects you don’t know what you have to do ahead of time.

Tracking time: Chrome plugin, post-it notes; spreadsheet of a time managed by a time-tracker

Q: minimum number of people? 4

ER&L 2016: Hard Data for Tough Choices: eBooks and pBooks in Academic Libraries

ebooks
“ebooks” by Randy Rodgers

Speakers: Katherine Leach and Matthew Connor Sullivan, Harvard

eBooks have not supplanted pBooks. Providing access to both formats is not possible…even for Harvard.

Users really do want and use both. There is a need for a better understanding of user behavior for both formats.

In 2014, they purchased the complete Project Muse collection, which included a significant and intentional overlap with their print collection. This allowed for a deep comparison and analysis.

You cannot compare them directly in a meaningful way. There are many ways of counting eBooks and pBooks are notoriously undercounted in their use. They looked at whether or not a book was used, and if it was used in only one format or multiple, and then how that compared to the average use across the collection.

26% of titles were used in both formats over the time period, only .5% on a monthly basis. It’s sometimes suggested that eBooks are used for discovery, but even at the monthly level this is not reflected in the data. The pattern of use of each format is generally about the same over the semester, but eBook use tends to be a little behind the pBook use. But, again, it’s difficult to get precise patterns of eBook use with monthly reports. There was no significant differences in format use by subject classification or imprint year or publisher, particularly when factoring the number of titles in each category.

They looked at the average decrease of a pBook over a four year period. They found a 35% decrease in circulation for each imprint year over that time, and this is without any impact of eBook. This is not always factored into these kinds of studies. They found that the decrease increases to 54% when eBooks are added to the mix. There’s also the issue of print use decreasing generally, with monographs losing out to eresources in student and faculty citation studies.

HSS at Harvard has been very clear that they want to continue the print collection at the level it has been, but they also want electronic access. How do we work with publishers to advocate for electronic access without having to purchase the book twice?

Audience Q&A:
What about providing short term loan access for the first 3-4 years? Harvard doesn’t like to purchase eBooks they don’t have perpetual access to.

P&E has been available for journals, why not books? Some publishers have worked with them to give deep discounts on print with an eBook package.

What has been the impact of electronic reserves on use? Haven’t looked at it.

How do you know if someone looked at the eBook and determined they didn’t want/need and that is why the pBook wasn’t used? Hard to determine. They don’t use eBook usage to drive the print acquisition — usually they already have the pBook.

Considering the lifecycle and the decrease in use over a short period of time from imprint year, does that cause you to question the purchase of eBook backfiles? eBook use over that time didn’t seem to decrease as significantly as the pBook.

ER&L 2016: Collections and Use

Infographics
“Infographics” by AJ Cann

The Bigger Picture: Creating a Statistics Dashboard That Ties Collection Building to Research
Speaker: Shannon Tharp, University of Wyoming

How can they tie the collection building efforts with the university’s research output? Need to articulate value to the stakeholders and advocate for budget increases.

She used Tableau to develop the dashboard and visualizations. Started with a broad overview of collections and then have expanded from there. The visualizations include a narrative and an intuitive interface to access more information.

The dashboard also includes qualitative interviews of faculty and research staff. They are tentatively calling this “faculty talk” and plan to have it up soon, with rotating interviews displaying. They are thinking about including graduate and undergraduate student interviews as well.

 

(e)Book Snapshot: Print and eBook Use in an Academic Library Consortium
Speaker: Joanna Voss, OhioLINK

What can we do to continue to meet the needs of students and faculty through the print to electronic book transition? Are there any patterns or trends in their use that will help? Anecdotally we hear about users preferring print to electronic. How do we find data to support this and to help them?

They cleaned up the data using Excel and OpenRefine, and then used Tableau for the analysis and visualization. OpenRefine is good for really messy data.

 

A Brief History of PaperStats
Speaker: Whitney Bates-Gomez, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Web-based tool for generating cost-per-use reports. It’s currently in beta and only working with JR1 reports. It works most of the time for COUNTER and SUSHI reports, but not always. The costs function requires you to upload the costs in a CSV format, and they were able to get that data from their subscription agent.

But, too bad for you, it’s going away at the end of the spring, but there might be a revised version out there some day. It’s through PubGet and Copyright Clearance Center decided to not renew their support.

ER&L 2016: Agents of Change: The Ongoing Challenges of Managing E-books and Streaming Media

change
“change” by samantha celera

Presenters: Steven R. Harris and Molly Beisler, University of Nevada, Reno

Evolution doesn’t happen in slow increments. Moments of punctuations happen quite suddenly. Ebooks are kind of like that in the evolution of the book.

In 2005, they were putting all formats on one record, manually updating the electronic content. As the quantity of ebooks increased, and the various licensing terms expanded, they were struggling to maintain this. In 2008, they began batch loading large numbers of eresources materials, with one person maintaining QA and merging records.

Then discovery services came in like an asteroid during the dinosaur age. They finally shifted from single record to separate records. They began tracking/coding ebooks to distinguish DDA from purchased, and expanded the ERM to track SU and other terms. This also prompted another staff reorganization.

They developed workflows via Sharepoint for new eresources depending on what the thing was: subscriptions/standing orders, one-time purchases with annual fees, and one-time purchases without annual fees. The streaming video packages fit okay in this workflow.

Streaming media has more complex access and troubleshooting issues. Platform as are variable, plugins may not be compatible. There are also many different access models (DDA, EBA) and many come with short-term licenses. Feel like the organization structure can support them as they figure out how to manage these.

They use a LibAnswers queue to track the various eresources problems come up.

Reiteration of the current library technology climate for eresources, with various challenges. No solutions.

The future comes with new problems due to next-gen ILS and their workflow quirks. With the industry consolidation, will everybody’s products work well with each other or will it become like the Amazon device ecosystem? Changing acquisitions models are challenges for collection development.

Be flexible. Do change. Agents.

ER&L 2016: Lightning Talks

Eric Frierson, EBSCO
Demoing a mobile interface called “Launch Pad”. Search results you can swipe left/right for the things you want, and then email the ones you want. The email includes persistent links, as well as other search suggestions and possibly a tutorial video as a kick-starter for the project you began a preliminary search on. The plan is that the code will eventually be released on GitHub.

Letitia Mukherjee, Elsevier
ScienceDirect APIs for institutional repositories, which helps with the metadata and embargoes for hosting final versions of articles. Looking for pilot institutions for embedding accepted manuscripts.

Bonnie Tijerina, IdeaDrop
Looking to take what they’ve been doing for the past four years and expand it. Would like support via the NewsChallenge.org site.

?, ?
Developed an “adapter” for digital files that can be retrieved and played/viewed on an open source tool.

Todd Carpenter, NISO
There is a standard for technical reports which is entirely print-based. Need people who are interested in taking this specification and modernize it, but no one has stepped up, yet. There is another standard on something something mono-lingual controlled vocabularies — linked data — but the name isn’t getting the volunteers in place to revise the 2005 revision to modern practices and technologies. If you are interested in technology, revise the old standards!

Todd Carpenter’s beard, NISO
Looking to develop a standard/best practice for text and data mining. Another project regarding the ebook reading experience and how libraries can manage that through API. Another thing about sharing human subjects’ data while maintaining privacy. Open to other ideas about things/problems/issues that need to be resolved.

Lana Zental, California Digital Library
Hiring a new data analyst.

Kate Sudowsky, ?
Plug for Usus.