Holy linkage, Librarian!

That’s right, I’ve been busy collecting all sorts of things to share.

    Women are striking for peace on November 11.
    Apparently, the British can’t rap, but I picked up a copy of Ms. Dynamite‘s CD, and it’s pretty good.
    The military’s homophobia could be a barrier in the War on Terrorism. Seven Arabic linguists were recently dismissed because they were discovered to be gay.
    An artist is making use of the pictures people were asked to take after 11 September 2001 to prove to airport security that their cameras were not hiding bombs.
    Was there really something going on between Marcia and Jan?
    This one made me smile. Do you think that First Lady Laura Bush is really a Democrat? Frankly, it wouldn’t surprise me.
    Lastly, the oldest book in the Purdue University Libraries will turn 500 years old this year.

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Continue reading “Holy linkage, Librarian!”

wild librarians

I read an article today in Library Juice about “Wild Librarian” websites; places like Anarchist Librarians and The Modified Librarian. I’m not sure if I would include the Eclectic Librarian in those ranks. I don’t intend to be a “wild librarian”, so perhaps it’s important that I explain why I chose that name for this site. I had been writing this blog under the oh-so-creative title “because everyone else is doing it”, but when I decided to get a real web hosting service (PowWeb) and register my own domain name, I needed something short and snappy that described me, and I didn’t want to use my own name. My chosen profession and paycheck earning love is as a librarian, but I certainly don’t fit the stereotype. I have many diverse interests, which anyone who knows me or reads this blog regularly will have discovered. Thus, the name “Eclectic Librarian” seemed to be the best descriptor of me and my interests. I don’t see it as playing on the supposed incongruity of having eclectic tastes and being a librarian.

“Thus, attempts such as these at busting the stereotype can have the paradoxical effect of reinforcing the stereotype. In highlighting the incongruity of being a wild librarian, they assert that the incongruity is an incongruity after all.”

Well. On with the links:

    Someone is having fun with Flash. Here’s a short (but humorous) clip of Opera Baby. [judy]
    Looking for a new job and want to make use of online resources? Here are a few tips. [free pint]

hiking

I went hiking today at the Pinnacles near Berea. As I drove up to the Indian Fort Theater parking lot, I could see little droplets of rain on my windshield and I wished that I had remembered to bring the rain jacket I bought after a hike in the rain last spring. It’s the kind of jacked that rolls up into a stuff sack the size of a hoagie bun. The rain didn’t continue, and by the time I got out of the car, it had stopped completely. None of the rest of my hiking companions had arrived, so I waited and watched the way the clouds draped over the tops of the foothills and attempted to read a book. Soon, Mary arrived and we decided to start hiking, since it didn’t seem that anyone else was coming today. The leaves on the trees had turned shades of red, orange, and yellow, with some greens remaining. When I would take my glasses off (the hike was strenuous enough that my body heat combined with the temperature made the lenses fog over frequently), it almost seemed like the far side of the hills were painted in watercolors that had bled together. I hadn’t hiked that trail in almost two years, and in the interim time I had forgotten that the trail went up and up without many level places until we reached the top. Once we were there, the view was well worth the effort. Mary and I stayed up there for fifteen or twenty minutes, catching our breath and enjoying the God-like feeling of watching the miniature world below. Then, we hiked back down (which was much easier than the hike up) and drove into Berea for a tasty lunch at Wanpen.

Two interesting articles arrived in my email today. One is yet another story about women in rock and how radio stations are starting to play them more. It’s well-written and does at least address the difficulty that women who write and perform original rock songs have in getting airplay on commercial radio stations.

“But not all radio stations are tuned in to the trend. When it comes to rock, testosterone still rules.”

The other story is the first positive article about weeding library collections I have ever read in a non-professional journal. It’s in the New York Times, so as usual, you’ll need to register in order to read it.

“In the lexicon of library science, managing such unwieldy growth is known as weeding. It’s the closest most New Yorkers will ever get to gardening.”

librarian celebrity

Last Thursday I had the opportunity to hear Kee Malesky speak at the Kentucky Library Association fall meeting. For many years now I have been envious of her job as one of the three reference librarians for NPR, but after hearing about the stress and intensity that is a part of her daily routine in a deadline oriented institution, I am glad I have my quiet cataloging job.

First it was Bert & Ernie, then it was Tinky Winky, and according to an article in the Wall Street Journal, some folks are claiming that SpongeBob SquarePants is gay. I don’t care one way or the other, but what gets me is that some people are afraid of gay characters in children’s television programming. With the backlash against even the hint of the possibility of a character being gay, should the number of hate crimes against gay people committed by youth really surprise us?

“Whether he’s intended to be a gay character or not, that’s the question people are asking,” responded Mr. Kenny. … “It’s never been addressed by us on the show,” he said, adding with a wink that besides, “all the main characters are hiding horrible secrets of their own.”

moving to new technology

Welcome to my new site! Hope you enjoy the change, I know I do.

There is an interesting article in the New York Times today about people who work with technology wanting to strip it out of their personal lives. I enjoy all of the tech stuff in my personal life at the moment, but there are times when I need a vacation from computers.

“There