swap a book

The United Kingdom celebrated Swap A Book Day last Friday.

The United Kingdom celebrated Swap A Book Day last Friday. According to this article in the Guardian, there are over 879 million illiterate adults in the world.

“It’s about creating role models and an atmosphere in which reading is seen as normal. That helps those who can’t read as much as people who can but don’t.” – Sue Williams, family learning tutor at Wigan and Leigh College

I was reminded of BookCrossing.com. I’ve been leaving books here and there after registering them with BookCrossing for the past couple of months. I’m not sure if they’re getting read, since so far, no one has registered them, but usually when I come back to where I left them, they’re gone. It gives me a little hope to think that someone took the book and will read it.

quiet libraries

Jessamyn West had the following quote from a review of a hard drive on her librarian.net blog today:

“The librarian in you will love Seagate’s new, ultralow-noise, consumer-friendly, 7,200rpm 80GB Barracuda ATA IV hard drive. Indeed, this drive is as quiet as the reference room on the night before midterms.”

Obviously this reviewer has never been in a library reference room the night before midterms, or else he might have found some other descriptor for “very, very quiet”. Midterms and finals weeks are two times in a semester when the library has the most number of users. With that many people all in one space, it is rare that one is able to find a quiet place in the building.

Continue reading “quiet libraries”

Beer Node

Jeff sent me some copies of pictures he took of the group of us at NASIG in June, and I finally got some scanned in and uploaded to my website. Here’s another shot of a bunch of us with the “Beer Node” sign. Ahh… good times. I should (or perhaps shouldn’t?) note that the new President of NASIG is one of the women in the “Beer Node” line-up…

Continue reading “Beer Node”

Lisa Rogers For President!

My friend Kiya Heartwood recently sent me a link to Lisa Rogers’ campaign site. I think it is about time we put a folksinger in the White House! Especially if it means we boot Dubya and his clones out of there.

“It’s so much easier just to complain. But I figure if I really want to help undo the mess, I should apply for W’s job. Let’s just say it’s my way, as a Texan, of apologizing to the rest of the world.”

What do you say? I’ll bet that if everyone who was dissatisfied with the current government situation (and it’s future prospects) were to write her on the ballot this next time when we have to choose between the Demagogue candidate and Dubya, she’d win! And wouldn’t the world be a much better place for it?

folk is lesbian music of choice, over-paid librarians, and other modern myths

My friend Anna sent me a link yesterday to an article about folk music having become the sound of lesbian culture. I have noticed this phenomenon, but I had never really thought about it specifically. You can read the full article yourself, but it will require a free registration with the New York Times.

“We’re seeing the coming together of a way of life and a form of expression that’s kind of primary,” says Lisa Merrill, a professor of performance history at Hofstra University. “This doesn’t happen often.”

A county in Washington State wants to dissolve the entire county library system, according to this New York Times article. So far, petitioners have managed to collect enough signatures that it might actually make it onto the ballot. Aparently some folks are upset that they pay an average of $38 per year in property taxes to keep the rural libraries up and running. <sarcasm>Gee, that sure is a big chunk to be taking out of some family’s budget.</sarcasm> Seriously, folks, don’t you think that is a small price to pay to have access to free books and computers?

“I home-school my kids, and our four library cards are maxed out at 40 books at all times,” said Linda Arrell, who lives off the electric power grid with her family north of here. “They say everybody is on the Internet, so we don’t need a library. Well, some of us don’t have credit cards, and some of us don’t have power.”

Oh, and that bit about the head librarian’s salary being too high? Let’s put this in perspective here, folks. Ms. Robinson is responsible for nine library branches, which includes all of the staff and budget issues that any large organization spanning a geographic area that size would have. If she were in the corporate world, she would be making three times as much.